Port Increases Safety of Stormwater Treatment Plant

 

Submitted by Port of Olympia

Storm water Port of OlyPort of Olympia has been working to identify and correct causes of the hydrogen peroxide spill that occurred at the Marine Terminal’s stormwater treatment plant on Jan. 28, 2015. The spill did not result in any chemicals entering Budd Inlet.

Immediately following the release of the hydrogen peroxide, the Port had an independent engineering firm assess the cause of the spill and evaluate potential improvements to make the system even safer. The firm found that a non-vented ball valve was the cause of the spill and identified areas where the system can be improved for efficiency and safety.

Port staff shared the engineering firm’s report with the Washington Dept of Ecology, which regulates industrial stormwater. Ecology asked the Port to proceed with design of the recommended improvements and the Port issued a contract with the same firm for the design services.

The Port’s goal is to have the full treatment system and any recommended improvements on-line in early 2016. In the interim, the Port is maximizing treatment from other portions of the treatment system and used the hydrogen peroxide recovered from the release in the treatment process.

State-of-the-Art Facility
Port of Olympia works closely with Ecology to ensure that the Port’s industrial stormwater treatment achieves regulatory requirements for water discharged into Puget Sound. The Port worked closely with its contractors to develop an innovative process to treat pollutants associated with log yard operations.

The Port improved and modernized the stormwater treatment facility on the Marine Terminal in 2014. The project included building conveyance piping, treatment ponds, the facility building and systems.

Governor Jay Inslee cut the ribbon and addressed Port staff and guests at the grand opening of the modern stormwater treatment facility on December 3, 2014.

The construction contract for modernizing the Marine Terminal stormwater treatment system total was $9.9 million. Total construction costs including the contract, administration, engineering and permitting were $11.1 million. Port tenants are contributing to the costs of facility construction and operations.

Port’s Commitment to Water Quality
The stormwater management program is a major element of Port of Olympia’s commitment to preventing, reducing and eliminating the discharge of pollutants into Puget Sound. Port staff work closely with tenants and Ecology to minimize the potential for pollutants to enter Budd Inlet from stormwater runoff flowing off impervious surfaces on Port properties.

 

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